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UPDATED: Flares, smoke bombs available online, sent via PosLaju

UPDATE May 16, 2014 (11.49am): 

As published in Malay Mail today

Pos Malaysia to probe flare, smoke bomb parcel

Pos Malaysia is conducting an investigation following Malay Mail’s expose that a flare and smoke bomb were couriered via PosLaju from Kulaijaya to the daily’s office in Redberry City here.

The national postal and courier service provider had, in a statement yesterday, said it was mandatory for senders to declare the items to be delivered to ensure they were not hazardous or prohibited.

Among the prohibited items listed in Postlaju’s Consignment Notes are firearms, combustible materials and drugs.

“These measures are consistent with the international best practices of postal and courier operators,” said the statement.

“Pos Malaysia always endeavours to exercise due care in its operations. In this instance, such care has been observed, implemented and complied with by Pos Malaysia/PosLaju. There was no reasonable ground for PosLaju to suspect the package would pose any physical danger to other persons or property.”

The statement, signed by group head, corporate communications and customer care, Datuk Rohaiza Hashim, said Pos Malaysia may only open a postal article under Section 53 of the Postal Services Act.

“This includes to secure the contents, if there were reasonable grounds to suspect there is a physical danger to persons or property, if there were health risks, or by court order,” it said.

“In this case, (there was) none of the circumstances which allow Pos Malaysia to open the postal article as stipulated in the Act.”

Posing as a football fan, Malay Mail had recently bought a flare and smoke bomb online for RM75. The items were labelled as “hub breaks” (brake hubs) and couriered to the office in Section 13 within days.

The address of the sender was in Kulaijaya, Johor Baru.

Consumer groups said they were surprised such products were easily obtained online and sent through PosLaju.

Flares and smoke bombs have hogged the news lately as football fans light them in the stands. Such items were also lit in broad daylight in Kuala Lumpur during the anti-Goods and Services Tax rally on May 1.

The possession and sales of such flammable items are deemed illegal under the Corrosive and Explosive Substances and Offensive Weapons Act.

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The national postal and courier service provider had, in a statement yesterday, said it was mandatory for senders to declare the items to be delivered to ensure they were not hazardous or prohibited.
Among the prohibited items listed in Postlaju’s Consignment Notes are firearms, combustible materials and drugs.
“These measures are consistent with the international best practices of postal and courier operators,” said the statement.
“Pos Malaysia always endeavours to exercise due care in its operations. In this instance, such care has been observed, implemented and complied with by Pos Malaysia/PosLaju. There was no reasonable ground for PosLaju to suspect the package would pose any physical danger to other persons or property.”
The statement, signed by group head, corporate communications and customer care, Datuk Rohaiza Hashim, said Pos Malaysia may only open a postal article under Section 45 of the Postal Services Act.
“This includes to secure the contents, if there were reasonable grounds to suspect there is a physical danger to persons or property, if there were health risks, or by court order,” it said.
“In this case, (there was) none of the circumstances which allow Pos Malaysia to open the postal article as stipulated in the Act.”
Posing as a football fan, Malay Mail had recently bought a flare and smoke bomb online for RM75. The items were labelled as “hub breaks” (brake hubs) and couriered to the office in Section 13 within days.
The address of the sender was in Kulaijaya, Johor Baru.
Consumer groups said they were surprised such products were easily obtained online and sent through PosLaju.
Flares and smoke bombs have hogged the news lately as football fans light them in the stands. Such items were also lit in broad daylight in Kuala Lumpur during the anti-Goods and Services Tax rally on May 1.
The possession and sales of such flammable items are deemed illegal under the Corrosive and Explosive Substances and Offensive Weapons Act.
- See more at: http://www.themalaymailonline.com/malaysia/article/after-firearm-parcel-expose-pos-malaysia-scrambles-into-action#sthash.MK4l7P0j.dpuf

UPDATE: May 15, 2014 (12.11pm): Consumer associations are surprised illegal items are easily obtainable online and sent via PosLaju and want the authorities to pay more attention to such crimes.

Read more here 

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As published in The Malay Mail May 14, 2014


All it takes is just several clicks online for a flare and smoke bomb to be delivered to one’s doorstep.

Even more worrying is that the flammable items can be sent via PosLaju, raising concerns if other flammable and illegal items are also sent through the national courier service.

Posing as a football fan, Malay Mail had recently purchased a flare and smoke bomb for RM75 with ease. The items were labelled as “hub breaks” (brake hubs) and couriered within days to our office in Redberry City, Petaling Jaya.

The seller claimed to be based in Johor Baru and had advertised the goods — including prices and latest arrivals — on social media.

According to Pos Malaysia’s website, dangerous, hazardous or combustible items are prohibited from being mailed or couriered. It also raises questions whether items are scanned thoroughly before being sent from one location to another.

Flares and smoke bombs have been in the news lately as football fans light them at the stands. Such items were also lit in broad daylight in the heart of the city during the anti-goods and services tax rally on May 1.

Kuala Lumpur police chief Datuk Seri Mohmad Salleh warned that such items were illegal.

“It is illegal to sell flares and smoke bombs under the Corrosive and Explosive Substances and Offensive Weapons Act. Possession of such items is also an offence while displaying such products online is an invitation to trade,” he said.

Dang Wangi OCPD ACP Zainuddin Ahmad said it was illegal for the public to obtain and carry flares and smoke bombs.

“Any sale of flammable material needs a licence from the Home Ministry and it is illegal to sell it online,” he said.

“If it is easily sold and posted to customers, then the courier service provider needs to do proper checks and it is their job to do so.”

The issue of flares and smoke bombs being lit in stands has irked many parties including the Football Association of Malaysia. The national football body’s security committee chairman, Datuk Salleh Mat Rashid, was recently quoted as saying action would be taken against fans who brought the flammable items into stadiums.

Efforts to obtain comments from Pos Malaysia since Saturday proved futile.

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